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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
difficult to deal with? why is the u.s. a decade into the war unable to go on patrol with afghans? >> one of the reasons is geographical. if you look at this relief map here, the border between afgh afghanistan and pakistan is very artificial. i've crossed the border many times. every time illegally. and the mountains that descend from the high table land of central asia to the steamy in this river valley, it's a very gradual descent. it's the same indough-islamic civilization on both sides of the border. so the sides that the u.s. military and diplomatic core is going to make two separate well functioning states out of it is somewhat adverse to geology. >> what's really going on, we tlinch are good guys and bad guys but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has sup pored, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or sub continent history, the same empire that controlled the northern th
how we get the rest of the u.s. economic house in order. >>> then an exclusive interview with bill gates, the richest man in the united states and the world's biggest philanthropist. i'll get his thoughts on the president's re-election, on the new innovation economy, and the revolution taking place in education. >>> and why the next foreign policy crisis for the world's number one power might well involve the world's number two power. but first here's my take. now that president obama has won re-election, the debate in washington has shifted from whether we should raise taxes to how and by how much. this makes sense. with a deficit over a trillion dollars, we will need a combination of increased tax revenues and spending cuts. the president and his allies including robert rubin have made the case that eliminating deductions simply will not get you enough money. you will actually have to raise tax rates. that's probably true as well. but let's not give up entirely on the issue of deductions and all those other hidden subsidies that the simpson-bowles report accurately called backdoo
of drugs in cities, while also destroying our penal system. the u.s. has more than three times as many prisoners per capita as we had in 1980 and about ten times as many prisoners per capita as other rich countries, according to data from the oecd. about 1.6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicate that americans have begun rethinking these policies, perhaps moving towards ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow our police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most stunning shift this week came not in the passage of a ballot measure or law but an exit poll finding, one that might move us toward major legislation. when asked what should be done with the almost 12 million illegal immigrants working in the u.s., almost 2/3 of respondents wanted to grant them legal status. now, remember, four years ago anti-immigrant voices were so loud that john mccain, the sponsor of a comprehensive and intelligent immigration reform bill-h to run away from his own handiwork when he was campaigning for the
-- in the case of romney, it will take one to two years for the dust to settle down. u.s., china relationship will come back an eventually stabilize because it's in the interest of both sides to keep a stable relationship. >> dominique, when you look at the european crisis, what i'm struck at is this may be the major international crisis where united states is really something of a bystander. it's not really involved much. it's involved on the margins. do europeans, is this part of the world? do europeans like this? do they wish the united states were more involved or are they thinking, you know what, we have the mechanisms to handle this and we're glad the obama administration is staying out? >> well, i think the europeans are witnessing the change, and it's not a question or liking it or disliking it. it's a reality. and from the standpoint, i think the europeans a bit like the chinese would say obama or romney, by the end of the day, it may not make such a big difference either on foreign policy or even in economic policy. but by the end of the day, the europeans support obama, i would say
"the first universal nation," arguing that the u.s. was coming up with something you neechlkt that diversity, he said, is going to be america's greatest strength in the years ahead. the gop has taken to looking at this new america with anxiety and fear. he was right. what the world saw this week was a picture of america at its best. empty, experimental, openly minded and brilliantly diverse. for more on this go to cnn.com/fareed. there's a link to my "washington post" column. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> let's get right to our panel to talk about just how you plan for a successful second term in the white house. my guests are all old white house hands. they are ken duberstein who was white house chief of staff in ronald reagan's second term. john podesta had the same job in bill clinton's second term and cnn's david gergen advised those two presidents plus presidents nixon and ford. john, you were there before and during the transition and chief of staff in the second term. how do you re-energize an administration going into the second term? is
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)